wine


How to add 14 more years to your life ?

While many in Singapore might be disillusioned about healthy living after seeing the sudden death last week (4th January) of Jimmy Nah, the healthy-looking 40-year-old comedian/actor who does not smoke or drink alcohol and have a clean bill of health, BBC this morning reported that a study shown “Taking exercise, drinking moderately, eating sufficient fruit and vegetables and not smoking can add as much as 14 years to your life”.

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The study between 1993 and 2006 by the UK’s Public Library of Science Medicine which involved 20,000 people aged between 45 and 79, suggested that regardless of how overweight or poor they were, they found those who failed on all criteria were four times more likely to have died than those who succeeded.

Participants were known during this period to be free from cancer or any heart problems.

The participants were awarded a point for :

1. not currently smoking
2. consuming between one and 14 units of alcohol per week (the equivalent of between half a glass and seven glasses of wine)
3. eating five servings of fruit and vegetables each day and not being inactive.

They found that the risk of

A 60-year-old person + score ZERO = a 74-year-old + FULL FOUR points

The conclusion was that many people through some simple changes can increase their lifespan as well as reduce their risk of dying from heart and circulatory disease as shown from the research participants.

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Red Wine Protects The Prostate – Harvard Men’s Health Watch

Researchers have found that men who drink an average of four to seven glasses of red wine per week are only 52% as likely to be diagnosed with prostate cancer as those who do not drink red wine, reports the June 2007 issue of Harvard Men’s Health Watch. In addition, red wine appears particularly protective against advanced or aggressive cancers.

Researchers in Seattle collected information about many factors that might influence the risk of prostate cancer in men between ages 40 and 64, including alcohol consumption. At first the results for alcohol consumption seemed similar to the findings of many earlier studies: There was no relationship between overall consumption and risk.

But the scientists went one step further by evaluating each type of alcoholic beverage independently. Here the news was surprising—wine drinking was linked to a reduced risk of prostate cancer. And when white wine was compared with red, red had the most benefit. Even low amounts seemed to help, and for every additional glass of red wine per week, the relative risk declined by 6%.

Why red wine? Doctors don’t know. But much of the speculation focuses on chemicals—including various flavonoids and resveratrol—missing from other alcoholic beverages. These components have antioxidant properties, and some appear to counterbalance androgens, the male hormones that stimulate the prostate.

Many doctors are reluctant to recommend drinking alcohol for health, fearing that their patients might assume that if a little alcohol is good, a lot might be better. The Harvard Men’s Health Watch notes that men who enjoy alcohol and can drink in moderation and responsibly may benefit from a lower risk of heart attack, stroke, diabetes, and cardiac death.