weight


Will you blame your friends if you become obese ?

James Fowler from Harvard University and Nicholas Christakis from the University of California, San Diego seem to suggest so. They co-authored the report which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine recently, basing on a 32-year (between 1971 and 2003) closely study of a network of 12,067 friends and relatives. 

They concluded in their study that obesity is a socially contagious phenomenon because “areas of the brain that correspond to actions such as eating food may be stimulated if these actions are observed by others“. Thus, weight gain in one person apparently influenced weight gain in others:- 

  1. a person’s chances of becoming obese increase by 57 percent if that person has a friend who is obese.
  2. Same-sex friends and siblings had more influence on the subject’s weight gain than those of the opposite sex.
  3. If a spouse became obese, the likelihood that the other spouse would become obese increased by 37 percent.

Is that why more than one third of the US population is overweight while 60 million US adults are obese? 

Well, one of the reasons – blame it on your friends !

Advertisements

9 ways to protect your heart from diabetes

Diabetes and heart disease often go hand in hand. Here’s how you can uncouple them.

Diabetes and heart disease were once thought to be entirely unrelated disorders. New thinking suggests that they may actually spring from the same underlying cause — chronic, systemwide inflammation — or at least be influenced by it. This intertwining is a bad thing, since developing diabetes usually means developing heart disease as well. It also has a silver lining: Protecting yourself against one of these chronic conditions works against the other, too.

More than one million Americans are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes each year. Traditionally, up to 80% of people with diabetes develop some form of cardiovascular disease, from heart attack and stroke to peripheral artery disease and heart failure.

The connection between the two diseases isn’t ironclad. The American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association have joined forces to fight both heart disease and diabetes. Their latest effort focuses on helping people with diabetes whose hearts seem healthy keep them that way.

As you scan the tips below, remember that almost every recommendation is good for diabetes as well as heart disease.

1. Know your risk

Goal: Knowledge is power. Calculate your risk of heart disease, or ask your doctor to do it.
Getting there: The Framingham calculator is a general heart disease–risk estimator. Specific ones for people with diabetes have been developed by two diabetes groups.

2. Exercise

Goal: Aim for at least 150 minutes a week of moderate exercise (like walking) or 90 minutes of vigorous exercise.
Getting there: If you do just one thing on this list, choose exercise. It is a key to controlling blood sugar, strengthens the heart and lungs, improves blood pressure, corrects out-of-whack cholesterol, and has other beneficial effects.

3. Control your weight

Goal: If your weight is in the healthy range, work to keep it there. If you are overweight, try to lose 5% to 7% of your weight over the next 12 months. (That’s about a pound a month for someone weighing 200 pounds.)
Getting there: Cutting out just one 12-ounce can of sugared soda a day (150 calories) is enough to help you lose a pound a month. You can easily double that by burning more calories with exercise.

4. Improve your diet

Goals:

  • Cut back on unhealthy fats: Lower saturated fat to under 7% of calories (about 17 grams), and keep trans fat intake as close to zero as possible.
  • Add more unsaturated fats from fish, grains, and vegetable oils.
  • Include at least 30 grams of fiber a day.
  • Watch the salt — reduce your intake to under 2,500 milligrams a day.
  • Choose whole grains and other slowly digested carbohydrates.

Getting there: The foods you eat can help you control blood sugar and protect your arteries. The main strategy is to get more fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, fish, and vegetable oils (especially olive oil), and less fast food, salty or fried food, and rapidly digested carbohydrates. There is no one-size-fits-all “diabetes diet.” The American Diabetes Association released a comprehensive set of nutrition recommendations in January 2007. But rather than trying to wade through these, ask your doctor to refer you to a nutritionist.

5. Lower your blood pressure

Goal: A healthy blood pressure is 120/80 or below. If you have high blood pressure, aim for a systolic pressure of 130 or lower and a diastolic pressure of 80 or lower.
Getting there: Measure your blood pressure often; home monitors are a good investment. If it is above the goal, try exercise, the DASH diet, and, if needed, weight loss, smoking cessation, or medications.

6. Control your cholesterol

Goal: Aim for and LDL under 100 mg/dL, an HDL above 40 mg/dL, and triglycerides under 150 mg/dL.
Getting there: A healthful diet and exercise can do a lot to reverse risky lipid levels. A cholesterol-lowering statin can help protect against heart attack and stroke even when LDL levels are near the recommended goal. Niacin or a fibrate can improve HDL and triglyceride levels.

7. Quit smoking

Goal: If you smoke, try to stop. Avoid secondhand smoke whenever possible.
Getting there: The most effective quitting strategy includes talk therapy plus nicotine replacement therapy along with drugs such as bupropion (generic, Wellbutrin, Zyban) or varenicline (Chantix).

8. Control your blood sugar

Goal: Aim for hemoglobin A1c to be at least under 7% and, ideally, as close to 6% as possible without causing bouts of low blood sugar.
Getting there: Managing carbohydrate intake and switching to whole grains can help ease the blood sugar roller coaster. Exercise is vitally important. Use medications such as metformin, thiazolidinediones, and insulin as needed.

9. Prevent clots

Goal: Take a low-dose aspirin (75–162 milligrams) every day unless your doctor tells you not to.
Getting there: Aspirin prevents platelets from latching onto each other, an early step in clot formation. Preventing clots helps prevent heart attack and stroke.

For more information on controlling diabetes, order the Special Health Report, Healthy Eating for Type 2 Diabetes, at www.health.harvard.edu/HED.

Increase in obesity and diabetes but decrease in deaths from Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) 

Epidemiologists at the University of Liverpool and the Heart of Mersey have found that approximately half the recent fall in coronary heart disease deaths in the US is due to positive life style changes and a further half to medical therapies.

The team found that a decrease in smoking, cholesterol, blood pressure and physical inactivity contributed to the fall in deaths from coronary heart disease, yet this decrease could have been substantially more had it not been for the increases in obesity and diabetes cases.

Coronary heart disease (CHD) death rates in the US almost halved between 1980 and 2000. To understand how this fall occurred scientists combined information on medical treatments with national changes in the levels of major risk factors, such as smoking and high cholesterol. The UK has seen similar falls in heart disease, but this fall is mainly attributed to healthier diets rather than medication.

From 1980 to 2000, the US death rates for CHD fell from 543 to 267 per 100,000 population among men and from 263 to 134 per 100,000 population among women. Overall there were 341, 745 fewer CHD deaths in 2000 than in 1980.

The team found that this decrease was attributed to reductions in risk factors such as total cholesterol, systolic blood pressure, smoking and physical inactivity. However, they found that this reduction could have been 15% more had it not been for an increase in obesity and diabetes. Approximately half the fall in CHD deaths was also attributed to medical treatments, including medications for heart failure and emergency treatments for heart attacks and angina.

Professor Simon Capewell, from the University of Liverpool’s Division of Public Health and Trustee at CHD prevention charity, Heart of Mersey, said: “Using a sophisticated computer model called IMPACT we were able to combine and analyse data on the uptake and effectiveness of specific cardiac treatments and changes in risk factors among adults aged 25 to 84 years in the US. Data included results from trials, official statistics and national surveys.

We found that CHD death rates halved, and 47% of the fall was attributed to medical treatments and approximately 44% to changes in risk factors. Prevalence of smoking, for example had fallen by 12%. Decreases in physical inactivity however, were offset by increases in body mass index and diabetes.

Robin Ireland, Chief Executive at Heart of Mersey, added: “We have recently seen similar falls in heart disease here in the UK. These changes mainly reflect healthier diets, not tablets. However the increase in obesity and diabetes are a wakeup call. They reflect the increasing consumption of large helpings of junk food. We need legislation to encourage food manufacturers and supermarkets to provide healthier food options.

Source:  News release issued by University of Liverpool.

10 things about the killer Constipation that I’ve learned 

Constipation in the past to me was just about the inability to pass motions smoothly, or in the crude language, inability to shit successfully in the toilet. 

My ignorance and indifference ceased when I have to understand this as part of the learning about our Good Image Tea, the unique tea which proves to resolve and prevent constipation, apart from its ability to detoxify the body particularly the gastro-intestinal system, promote metabolism, escalates toxin removal, enhances complexion and swiftly remove excess fats. 

Besides fats, constipation is what I keep hearing. Now, I have learned 10 things about not messing with constipation. 

(1) Constipation is not just about the problem of having hard stools or problems in passing stools, Constipation can also be defined as having fewer bowel movements than usual. It is a symptom and not a disease. 

(2) It is one symptom that no one particularly the older folks wants to admit or talk openly about. Doctors especially in the
U.S. probably knew best since it is the most common gastrointestinal complaint there clocking about 2 million patient visits annually.
 

(3) 1 in 2 women suffers from constipation, I read in one brochure on constipation.  Elsewhere, on the net, we can read that older people are more likely than younger people to become constipated. 

(4) 80% of
New York women constipated.
This is what a doctor author wrote in his book about the amusing
New York women protest in 1994 demanding the government heath department to address the constipation issue plaguing women. According to the 1991 National Health Interview Survey, about 4 1/2 million people in the
United States say they are constipated most or all of the time.
 

(5) Constipation is the weight that even the strongest man in the world will not be able to force out easily. For those who have constipated, you will know what I meant? 

(6) Constipation can be the worst nightmare and it is better off getting pregnant than constipated. This is what one blogger wrote about her ordeal of “Numbness, pain, sometimes balance loss or limping, insomnia” “after two days of not normal toilet visits”. “The soonest it ends everything goes back to ‘normal’”. 

 

(7) What shocked me is that constipation can be the cause that resulted in stroke or heart attack. 

I recalled about people who died in their sleep or died sitting in their sofa, car, etc. Postmortem showed that they died of stroke or heart attack. But to think it can also be due to constipation is surprising. 

During my recent trip to
China with my factory boss, we met our partners and friends about packaging our Good Image Tea.
 

They told me that it will be extremely dangerous for those who had constipation and yet do not know that they have high blood pressure or brain tumor. If they decide to force the stools out, the prolonged strain will naturally cause the blood pressure to shoot up which might trigger a stroke or heart attack. 

Even if the person does not have a heart attack, straining oneself while holding one’s breath to force out the stools can cause the haemorrhoidal blood pressure to increase. The rough dry faeces might cause abrasions and rupture the surrounding tissues of the anus and thus cause bleeding, painful defecation and stress. 

(8) The hard stools that causes constipation is at the front and is just 3 to 5 cm long while the rest following that are soft or watery. 

(9) The large intestine (colon) which is about 1.5 meters long receives the waste from the small intestine at about 10 cm per hour. It compresses the waste and absorbs the water before the solid waste or stools reach the anus. If the stools are stuck at the anus for too long, it will lead to the hardening of the stools starting from the front. Just imagine that if we eat and eat and do not pass out the stools in 15 hours, the whole large intestine will be jammed. 

(10) No wonder the Chinese has a saying that “一日不排便,毒胜三包烟” which means that if one does not discharge stools from the body every day, its toxin in the body is worst than smoking three packages of cigarettes. 

Healthy Liver, Beautiful Skin

girl-thumbs-up.jpg

Unlike the computer that I have faced for more than 20 years, the human body is a different and complex machinery that I have to learn now. As part of understanding my product Good Image Tea (green tea), I have to gather feedback from customers and friends on what effects it has on them after taking our uniquely formulated detox/anti-constipation/excess fat removal beverage.

Weight reduction is not so obvious unless the weight was measured before and after drinking the Good Image Tea religiously for a period of about 45 days.

What I heard commonly is that their skin complexion becomes obviously better, especially for those who have not or were unsuccessful in taking care of their skin.

It was explained to me that when the body is free from toxin, the organs like the liver will be healthy. The liver has many functions. They include:

  • Storing energy in the form of sugar (glucose)
  • Storing vitamins, iron, and other minerals
  • Making proteins, including blood clotting factors, to keep the body healthy and help it grow
  • Killing germs that enter the body through the intestine
  • Processing worn out red blood cells
  • Making bile which is needed for food digestion
  • Metabolizing or breaking down many medications and alcohol

I read that the liver shoulders a heavy workload for the body, plays an important role in the metabolism and almost never complains as it can also regenerate itself. The liver breakdowns and filters the oily fats from the food we take and excrete the waste through the intestines. If the liver is overworked or ill and is unable to filter effectively, the skin is the alternative venue for such removal. Otherwise, those oily fats can reach the kidney and adversely affect the function of the kidney.

We have a saying, “要美的起来,就须要健康 which translates as “Be healthy so as to become beautiful” .

Thus, with a detoxed body which translates to healthy organs reinforced with the antioxidants found in the green tea and other supporting herbs, the skin should naturally become better and more radiant.

Contrary to my last posting OVERWEIGHT OR OBESE IS FAT – WHAT ELSE TO TALK ABOUT?“, I have just gotten the news that the World Health Organisation estimated currently that there are 1.6 billion overweight adults and at least 400 million obese adults worldwide. This is over 30% of the population on earth based on the CIA Factbook, which estimated that the world population stands at 6.6 billion.

It is also projected that in 8 years time, these numbers will increase by 44% and 75% respectively. That means that in 2015, there will about 2.3 billion overweight adults and 700 million obese adults.

It is also no longer the problem faced by the high-income countries. It is on the rise in middle-income and low-income countries as well, particularly in the urban areas. 

If these numbers speak about adults, what about the children ?

Overweight, overeat

OVERWEIGHT OR OBESE IS FAT – WHAT ELSE TO TALK ABOUT? The subject of overweight, obese or fat has never interest me before until now.  It just came across to me that there was reported 1 billion people in the world that are overweight including 300 millions who are obese.  As I am fortunate that I am not one of the 30% of Singaporean reported to be overweight or obese, all these while, to me, overweight or obese is just being fat. 

Now that I recalled, in the print and broadcast media, we frequently see and read that hypertension, constipation, diabetes, heart disease, fatty liver, degeneration of the kidney, etc. creep into lives of middle age men and women, especially the aged folks. 

While being slightly overweight is very common, being obese is no joke. I have noted down that that obesity is regarded an invisible killer which causes numerous contemporary diseases. It was reported that how vulnerable are obese people as compared to normal people in terms of the following diseases: 

  1. hypertension incidence rate, obese people are 3 times higher
  2. atherosclerosis incident rate, obese people are 2-3 times higher
  3. heart disease and arteriosclerosis incident rate, obese people are 2.5 times higher
  4. cancer incidence rate, obese people are twice higher

Now I learned that there are fundamentally four factors that lead to obesity. 

  1. Congenital  obesity – this is hereditary, which means that it is genetically passed down from parent to their offspring
  2. Pathological obesity – caused by infection from disease
  3. Medicinal obesity – caused by medicinal drugs that affect the hormones. One of the common hormonal drugs is oral contraceptives.
  4. Acquired obesity – this is caused by unbalanced diet, excessive consumption of meat, sugary food and animal fat, or just being gluttonous.

For the congenital, pathological and medicinal obese people, if they intend to lose weight, they will need to consult their doctors who will diagnose and prescript the appropriate remedy. 

Acquired obesity is easy to take care of. There are all kinds of pills and medicines that can take care of it but there can be different side effects which need to be advised by professional doctors.  Another type is the used of traditional herbs like those found in Good Image Tea which is proven to safely and swiftly decompose the excessive solid fat accumulated in the body. The result is also the cleansing of the intestinal systems which also solve the habitual constipation problem that many people in the world are suffering from. 

« Previous PageNext Page »